What Works Best to Get Rid of Hyperpigmentation? - The Skincare Edit

What Works Best to Get Rid of Hyperpigmentation?

A derm's advice.
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Welcome to our Ask Beautyeditor column, where our experts answer your hair, skin and makeup questions. To request skincare advice:

  • Email hello@beautyeditor.ca with “Skincare Question” in the subject line.
  • Briefly describe your skin issue.

Please note: All photos will be published.

Q: I used Clinique's Dark Spot Corrector for three months. I did notice a minimal difference after a week, but that didn't last long. I developed blackheads (never had blackheads before this—I'm 35). I also used the Clinique Skin Tone Correcting Moisturizer religiously. I saw no results (other than the week of slight improvement).

Now I have been using NeoStrata HQ Skin Lightening Gel (2 percent hydroquinone) for a month. No change with this product with either. I've only been applying this to two spots of hyperpigmentation on my upper lip. I'm going to stick it out for another month.

My sister-in-law used Lustra (4 percent hydroquinone), and had wonderful results. She stopped using it after four months, and her spots are back.

I've grown a little tired of searching for a "miracle in a bottle." Are there any products or procedures you can recommend? — Kim

A: Kim, the pigmentation you are describing may be melasma, which is very hard to treat.

Higher strength hydroquinones, like the Lustra you describe, may help.

Melasma will commonly recur, especially if there is sun exposure to the area. Apply a strong sunscreen to the area every day to prevent it from getting worse or recurring.

If none of the products are working, then see a dermatologist, who can make a proper diagnosis and recommend a treatment regimen.

Dr. Nowell Solish is one of Canada's top cosmetic dermatologists, with an office at 66 Avenue Road, Suite 1, in Toronto. Call 416-964-8888 to book an appointment.

Disclaimer: This information is for general purposes only and is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice relative to your specific medical condition or question. Dr. Solish recommends that you consult your physician or other medical professional for insight into your specific condition and medical options.

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